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Scrum Master Mind Map













Just remembered I built this mind map a while ago on a Scrum Master contract. There are a few things that I have learn't since and would probably change. Its always interesting to look back though and see how you felt about something at the time.

I guess the main thing that leaps out at me is that I saw it as a leadership role, without the 'servant' bit in front of it. I may well have 'frustrated' other team members with my domineering attitude.

You'll be delighted to know that I haven't changed a bit.......

Comments

  1. I can second that last line... :-)

    You may have seen it as a leadership role at the time, hence some of the strong statements. One thing that really stands out, though, is the emphasis at every stage on being positive and conveying that to the team. I know many a manager and lead who could benefit from that top tip alone.

    ReplyDelete
  2. A good summary... A few 'lessons learned' over the years.

    1. Plan to stabilise your demo/showcase at the end of the iteration. Don't assume you can carry on coding until 5 mins before the deadline :-)

    2. Have a defect triage process and follow it periodically. Is the 'defect' really critical for this iteration? Is it really a defect or a requirements issue (new story).

    3. Consider technical debt. Re-factoring should be par for the course but this is 'hidden' from estimates.

    4. When to do the stand up. Keep it regular and permanent. There is never an excuse not to hold a standup, even if the build is broken.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love mind maps! I'm working in the testing/development software industry and I'm finding the tool so super helpful.

    Also, I'm passing this on to my friend who's a scrummaster. She'll find it really cool, I think.

    /@kendalpeiguss

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi there,
    Love your article .Specially the Map featuring part.Scrum study also has interesting ways to teach the students for agile scrum certification ( Scrum Master Certification ) courses. check their website for some free introductory course in scrum

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Angelina

      I do keep meaning to update the map based on my experience of the last couple of years. Plus I have done Product Ownership since too, have a different point of view.

      It might be fun to do the whole exercise again and compare the two. See how much my perception of the role has changed!

      All the best,

      Ash

      Delete

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