Wednesday, 9 September 2015

Under Pressure


As a tester, you might recognise this feeling.

The world wants your tests to “pass.” Developers, Product Owners, Project Managers, Executives, everyone is looking at you, waiting for you, wanting the tests to “pass.” Wanting this feature to be delivered, this final piece of the going live puzzle.

Has it “passed” then?

Whatever it is, it hasn’t, it can’t, at the heart of the matter, that isn't how exploration works. There are perceived and non-perceived problems, inconsistencies, misunderstandings, and conflicting stakeholder perceptions. It’s not your judgement to give, however this doesn’t mean that you don’t feel any pressure as a human being.

When you feel it, here are some fun thoughts that you might want to bear in mind:
  • It’s really not your pressure. One of the key lessons I have learnt is not to accept the pressure of others. I’m a real responsibility magnet (there is a whole other blog there). But I make no promises when it comes to testing, I just mine for information. Stop accepting others pressure and watch your testing life transform.
  • Shit ain’t all down to you. It’s not honest, you are special and important but… For example, very early in my career, I had the last blocking bug on a gigantic, multi-multi-multi million pound offshoring project. I was being crushed by ownership of this hideous carbuncle of a bug. Afterwards I realised, it wasn’t mine. The root of that glittering pearl of a problem was way, way back in the mists of the project. Somewhere I had no control of at all. In another organisation. In the past. I had zero influence, literally nothing to be done.
  • It's quite popular to say “I’m giving information about quality to someone who matters.” Don’t even say that. Just say information to someone who matters. We need more distance from quality, not less. Every time you talk about testing and quality, you are creating a false link. It’s not real and confuses those who are already confused about what testing is for. Stop it.
  • Lastly the Zen bit. Nobody wants tests to fail, probably. But this is the rub. They don’t fail. You just learn. It’s true. Once you change from failing to learning, an infinite dimension of satisfaction opens up in your testing. You will find serenity in this thought, even in the most turbulent organisation.

Just remember, as a tester, the moment you allow the words “the test has passed” to pass your lips, turned anything green, given a thumbs up, cheeky grin, however you do it, remember the myth you are perpetuating. That the information gained from exploration is a tester’s responsibility.

It’s everyone’s responsibility. I hear that a lot. Let’s live it.

1 comment:

  1. I enjoyed this article. Not very long but great substance. Thanks

    ReplyDelete