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By the community, for the community

I was going to write a blog about the various activities we participated in on a fantastic day at the Leeds testing community's second Atelier. Trust me they were great, but a comment I received the day after intruiged me more. An attendee said to me:


After the conference yesterday, I realised that "what are testers?" is a much more interesting question than "what is testing?"

I dug a little, asked for the deeper reasoning:


Well, it's event like yesterday where you see testers are a far more diverse bunch of people than any other field of IT I can think of.

I was knocked back, I believe this was what we wanted to reflect with this event all along.



When I consider, we chose a venue which reflected our values. Wharf Chambers, a workers co-op which is run with fairness and equality at its heart. Every comment received was that the relaxed atmosphere enhanced the event, people happily participated, asked questions. For me, much better than a hotel, auditorium or meeting room.

Then look at the sponsors, Ministry of Testing, I need say no more. The Test People. I was forged there to be honest, it will be with me forever. Callcredit. I was inspired there. Then, a chap called Tony Holroyd withdrew some money from his personal development fund and gave it to us. To me, that is amazing.



Our contributors were of all ages, genders, nationalities, experience levels, backgrounds, disciplines, testers turned entrepreneurs, agile coaches, graduates who had been through the 'testing academy', an increasingly common phenomenon.




I can't thank everyone who was part of the day enough, it's a long list, you know who you are.

Now to rest, then reflect and look to the next Atelier... 

Comments

  1. Its amazing blog to read out. I loved reading it thoroughly. Well, recently I also attended a conference at corporate events Chicago venue with all my colleagues. I had given presentation there which was attended by more than 100 people.

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