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Testing Thank You's for 2016


I want to close 2016 with some thank you's to people who have helped and influenced me this year:

  • Leeds Testing Atelier and Crew - organising not one but two Ateliers this year has been an absolute blast. The days themselves are great, but I value the company of six other like-minded people, who are dedicated to sharing knowledge and making life a bit better. Independent, not for profit but for joy. It, by some distance, has made 2016 a year to remember. Thank you for the laughs, hangovers and friendship.
  • Ministry of Testing - I had the privilege of delivering a workshop at TestBash Brighton this year. Not much makes me nervous, but delivering my content at such an event certainly did. As an individual achievement, it made me very proud indeed. Then the year got better, I then presented an infrastructure masterclass in October. Thank you for the opportunities and support.
  • Gus and SpeakEasy - I reached out for help from SpeakEasy this year and Augusto Evangelisti kindly volunteered to help me with my speaking career and, well, anything else we wanted to talk about. Gus is thoughtful and forthright, challenges my assumptions, internal models and always reminds me to think about building relationships and listening to customers. Thanks for everything Gus, I will be calling on you in the New Year.
  • Lesley Walkinshaw -  it is so refreshing to work with someone who believes that by building a community within an organisation, everyone's life can be that bit more awesome. Going back into a permanent role wasn't an easy decision, but you made a big difference. Thank you for your knowledge, patience and inclusive nature.
  • Anyone I have coached - I have coached a number of people this year, both in testing and career contexts. I am always captivated by their stories, their capacity to develop themselves and teach me about myself and how I perceive the world around me. Thank you, you know who you are.
Thats not everyone, but there have been so many I picked my highlights. For everyone else, thank you for helping me learn, in success and failure. 

2017 is going to be full of opportunity again. TestBash NL, DEWT, Copenhagen Context, Ateliers, Testers Gathering reboot in Leeds, Testing Showcase North. Oh and writing a book on testability with my partner in all things, Gwen Diagram, who deserves the biggest thanks of all. 


Comments

  1. It was a pleasure to get to know you and learn with you. I look forward to the next chat!

    ReplyDelete
  2. That is so nice of you to express your gratitute in this way. I hope the new year also bring you more success and happiness in life and you remain successful in your ventures.

    ReplyDelete

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