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Agile Coaching Book Review - My Favourite Bits Mindmapped!

Quick one!

Recently finished reading 'Agile Coaching' by Rachel Davies and Liz Sedley. Most enjoyable, plenty of wincing moments when I recognised my own faux pas on the coaching front! Lots of practical tips too, which is what I like.

Anyway, I have mindmapped my favourite bits! Enjoy.

http://www.mindmup.com/#m:a198e746e05836013101307a854846eb1d


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